Asia Pacific Development and Security Researchers

Minako SakaiAssociate Professor Minako Sakai

Minako Sakai is Associate Professor in Southeast Asian Social Inquiry and Indonesian Studies at the School of Humanities and Social Sciences. She is the lead of Asia Pacific Development and Security Research Group and previously chaired of the Asia-Pacific Seminar Series (insert Link). She has published in the areas of anthropology of development, religion (Islam) and its social engagement, disaster resilience, and gender and inequality in social policies with a focus on Indonesia and Muslim countries. She is supervising research students working on community empowerment and is undertaking research related to gender empowerment through business and technological innovations for Muslim women in Indonesia.

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Associate Professor Jan BreckenridgeAssociate Professor Jan Breckenridge

Jan Breckenridge is an Associate Professor and Acting Head of the School of Social Sciences, and the Co-Convener of the UNSW Gendered Violence Research Network, UNSW. Jan’s research is oriented towards maximum impact in innovative social policy development, service provision and outcome measurement of effectiveness. Jan leads an evidence informed knowledge-exchange stream ‘Gendered Violence and Organisations’ which provides expert advice to government, private and third sector organisations on best practice policies and organisational response to employees and the management of customers affected by domestic and family violence, sexual assault and sexual harassment.

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Professor Deborah BlackmanProfessor Deborah Blackman

Professor Deborah Blackman is a Professor in Public sector Management Strategy at UNSW Canberra. She is interested in large-scale systems change in terms of both complex system structures and where there is scope for long-term change. Her research has been focused works on aspects of long-term recovery and resilience after natural disasters having been part of teams undertaking research in both New Zealand and Japan. From this a need to see long-term disaster a complex system has emerged, and this is an aspect that she is currently developing. Professor Blackman was also part of a team that was funded by Toyota to consider the role of social capital in creating more effective volunteer support post-disaster.

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Dr Sarah Cook

Sarah Cook is the Director, Institute of Global Development at UNSW. She previously led UNICEF’s Office of Research, and the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development (UNRISD), and has worked at the Institute of Development Studies in the UK, and with the Ford Foundation in China. Her research covers issues at the intersection of economic and social policy, with a primary focus on China’s development. She has worked extensively on gender issues in China, on care work, labour force participation and women’s political participation. Sarah has managed a number of multi-country and interdisciplinary research programmes in Asia, including on social protection, on informal employment and on migration and health. Relevant publications include ‘Harsh Choices: Chinese Women’s Paid Work and Unpaid Care Responsibilities under Economic Reform’ (with Xiao-yuan Dong) in Development and Change (July 2011). Volume 42, Issue 4, pages 947–965 and Social protection as development policy-Asian perspectives Edited volume, with Naila Kabeer, July 2010, Routledge India.

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Scientia Professor Louise EdwardsScientia Professor Louise Edwards

Louise Edwards is Scientia Professor of Chinese History at UNSW’s School of Humanities and Languages. Louise publishes on women and gender in China. Her most recent sole-authored books include Women Warriors and Wartime Spies of China (Cambridge University Press 2016), Women, Politics and Democracy: Women’s Suffrage in China (Stanford University Press 2008) and she is co-editor of Vol. 4 of the Cambridge World History of Violence (forthcoming). Her current research project explores gendered cultures of war, peace and militarization. She is an elected Fellow of the Academy of Humanities in Australia, the Australian Academy of Social Sciences and the Hong Kong Academy of Humanities.

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Douglas GuilfoyleAssociate Professor Douglas Guilfoyle

Douglas Guilfoyle is Associate Professor of International and Security Law at the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, UNSW Canberra. He is a 2019-2020 Visiting Legal Fellow with the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and a contributing editor to the European Journal of International Law blog, EJIL:Talk!. His major research themes are maritime security, the international law of the sea and international and transnational crime. Particular areas of specialism include maritime law-enforcement, the law of naval warfare, international courts and tribunals, and the history of international law.

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Dr Nelia Hyndman-RizkDr Nelia Hyndman-Rizk

She is an anthropologist of migration, her research interests include the Lebanese diaspora, multiculturalism, cross cultural competency and health, comparative ethnic entrepreneurship, gender and women's rights movements in the Middle East.

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Tanya JakimowDr Tanya Jakimow

Tanya Jakimow is an anthropologist of development, researching in India and Indonesia. The central focus of her work is the micro-politics of local level development. Her current book project brings affect theory into conversation with theories of power in Development Studies to propose a new approach to understanding power configurations in local level development. It draws upon ethnographic research with volunteers in a community-driven development program in Medan, Indonesia, and with women Municipal Councillors in Dehra Dun, India, and was funded by an Australian Research Council DECRA Award. Tanya previous research includes topics such as agrarian change, livelihoods, and small local NGOs

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Tristan MossDr Tristan Moss

Dr Tristan Moss is a lecturer in history in the School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences. He completed his PhD at the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre at the Australian National University, for which he was awarded the C E W Bean Prize for Military History. His first book, Guarding the Periphery: the Australian Army in Papua New Guinea, 1951–75, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2017. Dr Moss is a Deputy Regional Coordinator (Asia) for the Society of Military History. His research focuses on Australian military history, particularly post-45, and he is currently working on a project on the history of Australian space policy.

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Dr Gavin MountDr Gavin Mount

Gavin Mount’s (BA Unimelb; MA, PhD ANU) research in this area has been on ethnic identity/conflict, nationalism, environmental hazards and early warning. He is currently the Associate Head of School (Research Training and has primary research expertise in the international and regional politics of ethnic conflict, nationalism and non-traditional security challenges. He has extensive teaching experience across all levels and was awarded the Rector’s Commendation for Excellence in Classroom Teaching in 2010. He has supervised doctoral research on topics such as religious nationalism, autonomy movements, ethnic conflict, and climate change and resource management. His recent publication included a chapter on hybrid notions of peacebuilding and development.

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Morten PedersenDr Morten Pedersen

Dr Morten Pedersen is Senior Lecturer in International Politics and Human Rights at UNSW Canberra and a former senior analyst for the International Crisis Group in Myanmar (2001-08). He has been working on Myanmar politics and development affairs for almost twenty years and has served as a policy advisor for, among others, the United Nations, the World Bank, the European Commission, the Australian government and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Martti Ahtisaari. His major publications include Promoting Human Rights in Burma: A Critique of Western Sanctions Policies (Rowman & Littlefield, 2008); with Anna Magnusson, A Good Office: Twenty Years of UN Mediation in Myanmar (International Peace Institute, 2012); and with David Kinley (eds), Principled Engagement: Negotiating Human Rights in Repressive States (Ashgate, 2013).

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Krishna ShresthaAssociate Professor Krishna Shrestha

Krishna K. Shrestha is a development and environmental geographer. Currently, he is Associate Professor at the School of Social Sciences, UNSW Sydney. His research program is in the interdisciplinary analysis of social and environmental justice, focusing on the intersection of development and environmental governance. Over the years, his research projects encompass four areas: a) political ecology and international development, b) climate change and urban planning, c) food security and livelihoods, and d) disaster resilience and justice. Connecting these is an overarching analytical thread of justice as redistribution and recognition. Most of his work is interdisciplinary and empirical in the Himalayas.

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Felix TanDr Felix Tan

Dr Tan is a researcher and senior lecturer of the UNSW Business School, Department of Information Systems and Technology Management (ISTM). Dr Tan’s research expertise is in technologically driven transformation of businesses and society. Dr Tan’s possesses rich case study experience across Asia and his current projects seeks to provide a deeper understanding of how digital multi-sided platforms and ecosystems drives entrepreneurship and social innovation. Dr Tan has published several articles highlighting economic empowerment through digital literacy, financial inclusion and community development. Dr Tan is a member of the Association of Information Systems standing committee and taskforce on Diversity & Inclusion (D&I) and the region 3 (Asia) representative. Dr Tan have authored/co-authored over 50 publications on Information Systems research including 13 journals (ranked A* or A) and over 40 conference papers. Dr Tan serve as an associate editor of Information Systems Journal (ISJ) and section editor of Australasian Journal of Information Systems (AJIS).

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Dr Alec ThorntonDr Alec Thornton

Dr Alec Thornton is Senior Lecturer in Geography at UNSW Canberra. Alec has extensive research experience in global development in the South Pacific on issue of food security, poverty and inequality sustainable livelihoods. He has won external funding from the Oceania Development Network and multiple-year funding from the Australian Government, DFAT, New Colombo Plan Mobility Program for his Geographic Research Methods Field School in Samoa. Among his publications, he is co-editor of Disaster Relief in the Asia Pacific: Agency and Resilience, Routledge (2014) and editor of Urban Food Democracy and Governance in North and South Palgrave MacMillan (2019).

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Pichamon YeophantongDr Pichamon Yeophantong

Dr Pichamon Yeophantong is an Australian Research Council DECRA Fellow and Senior Lecturer in International Relations and Development. She is a China specialist, with expertise on Chinese foreign policy and sustainable development in the Asia-Pacific. She is also a research associate at, inter alia, the Global Economic Governance Programme (University College, Oxford), the Institute of Asian and Pacific Studies (University of Nottingham Ningbo), and the UNSW Global Water Institute. She has written extensively on Chinese approaches to global governance and is co-author with Chih-yu Shih et al of China and International Theory (Routledge 2019).

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Nicolaas WarouwNicolaas Warouw

Nicolaas Warouw has taught and conducted research in social science, particularly in the area of industrial labour in Indonesia, from labour activism to labour's engagement in local politics. His research for Ph.D in anthropology at the Australian National University (2004) was an ethnography of manufacturing workers and modernity in western Java. He was a postdoc fellow at the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Carribean Studies (KITLV) in Leiden, the Netherlands, from 2009 to 2010. Before joining UNSW Canberra in 2013, he was teaching at department of anthropology, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia.

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Associate Professor Jian ZhangAssociate Professor Jian Zhang

Jian Zhang: Associate Professor Jian Zhang is the Deputy Head of the School of Humanities & Social Sciences, UNSW Canberra. He specialises in China’s foreign and security policies, Chinese military affairs and Australia-China relations. He is a member of the Australian Committee of the Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia Pacific (CSCAP), a member of the Executive Committee (2018-2021) of International Studies Association (ISA) Asia-Pacific and an adjunct Senior Fellow at the Institute for Security & Development Policy (ISDP) at Stockholm, Sweden. He has written extensively on Chinese foreign policy and the South China Sea dispute. His publications include Building ‘a harmonious world’? Chinese perceptions of regional order (Australian Strategic Policy Institute, 2007).

 

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Satish ChandProfessor Satish Chand

Satish Chand is Professor of Finance in the School of Business at the University of New South Wales Canberra. His research interests include labour migration, land reform, and the challenges of development in communities torn by conflict. For the past several years, Satish has been researching the rebound in the economy of Bougainville and how this rebound is helping sustain peace following the decade long conflict.

 

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Claudia TazreiterProfessor Claudia Tazreiter

Claudia Tazreiter is Associate Professor of sociology at the University of New South Wales, Australia. Her research is in the fields of political sociology, social theory, visual cultures, race, ethnicity and migration with a focus on the social and affective impacts of forced and irregular migration, on human rights culture, the role of civil society in social change and visual cultures of dissent. She is the author of numerous articles, chapters and books including: Asylum Seekers and the State. The Politics of Protection in a Security-Conscious World (Ashgate 2004, 2006); Fluid Security in the Asia Pacific. Transnational Lives, Human Rights and State Control (Palgrave 2016); and the Handbook on Migration and Global Justice, edited with Leanne Weber (forthcoming, Edward Elgar). Claudia co-convenes the Forced Migration Research Network at UNSW. She has held visiting appointments at the Institute for Political Science, University Vienna (2018), Center for Place, Culture and Politics, City University New Work CUNY (2014) and the Centre for International Studies (CERI) Science Po (2011) and is fellow at the Institute for Migration and Intercultural Studies (IMIS), University Osnabrück.

 

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Shraddha KashyapShraddha Kashyap

Shraddha Kashyap, PhD, is a registered Psychologist and a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Refugee Trauma and Recovery Program, in the School of Psychology at the University of New South Wales. Shraddha’s program of research explores how the psychological wellbeing of people with refugee backgrounds may be influenced by how they adapt to life over time, during periods of displacement, and post-resettlement. Shraddha’s current research (funded by an ARC Linkage Project Grant) aims to study how refugees living in Indonesia adapt to life during protracted displacement, by collaborating with a settlement service provider in the Asia-Pacific region (HOST International), and an Indonesian legal-aid service (SUAKA).

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Angela Nickerson

 

Angela Nickerson is Associate Professor and Director of the Refugee Trauma and Recovery Program at the School of Psychology at UNSW. She conducts research into the psychological and social factors that impact on refugee mental health and adaptation, with the ultimate goal of informing policy and practice. She is especially interested in understanding factors predicting resilience for refugees in a state of sustained displacement. She is currently undertaking a collaborative longitudinal project with HOST International and SUAKA investigating the wellbeing of refugees living in Indonesia, funded by an

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Visiting Fellows

 

Amelia FauziaAmelia Fauzia

Amelia Fauzia is a social historian specializing on Islamic philanthropy in Indonesia. Among her other research interests are messianic movement, women, disaster relief, and radicalism. She was granted a fellowship at ARI-NUS on networks of Islamic philanthropy in Southeast Asia. She developed a micro insurance model for reducing inequality through health protection program and has led a research-piloting project on Muslim women economic empowerment, both funded by the Ford Foundation Indonesia. Among her publications are ‘Faith and the State: A History of Islamic Philanthropy in Indonesia’ (Brill, 2013) and ‘Islamic Orientation in Contemporary Indonesia: Islamism on the Rise?’ with M. Sakai (Asian Ethnicity, 2014).Amelia Fauzia is the Director of Social Trust Fund, The State Islamic University, Jakarta. She is a leading researcher on the history of Islamic philanthropy in Indonesia.

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RadziRafisah Mat Radzi

Rafisah Mat Radzi is a PhD from the University of South Australia and has been an active researcher over the past five years. Throughout her short career, she spearheaded many major research projects in various fields such as Islamic finance, capital market and supply chain management. She continued to make her mark when she was awarded two international  research grants from the Sumitomo Foundation, Japan and Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA), UK. At the national level, she has successfully secured a few research grants funded by USM (short-term grant) and the Malaysian Ministry of Education (fundamental research grant and transdisciplinary research grant). With such tremendous achievement, she successfully published a few articles in international journals, and currently she is on the editorial boards of two esteemed international journals..

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Sultana RabeyaSultana Rabeya

Mst. Sultana Rabeya is a Lecturer of political Science department at Government M.M. Ali College, Kagmari, Tangail, Bangladesh, Under the Education ministry of Dhaka. She is working in this department for five years. Now, she is working at the University of New South Wales (UNSW), Canberra, as a visitor under the visiting fellowship program 2019. She is hosted by Associate Professor Dr. Minako Sakai, UNSW, Canberra. In her country, she was working on food security, women leadership in politics; past and present, woman Quota system in Bangladesh Politics: impact on social-political development. Now, she interests to work on women political empowerment in Bangladesh as well as the world‘s women political empowerment.

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Associate Professor Stephen SherlockStephen Sherlock

Dr Stephen Sherlock is Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of New South Wales, Canberra. His research interests are in Indonesia and Southeast Asia, focusing on the political economy of elections, political parties, parliaments and women’s political empowerment. As an international political governance consultant, he has wide experience working on training, policy development, research projects and capacity-building programs in the Indonesian parliament, government ministries, CSOs and political parties. He is a former Director of the Centre for Democratic Institutions (CDI) at ANU. Dr Sherlock has worked extensively with Indonesian institutions active in the field of institutional strengthening, legislative affairs and policy and has published widely on Indonesian governance and democratic development.

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