ACSACS Publications

The Long Road: Australia's train, advise and assist missions

Helping neighbours and partners stabilise their political systems and work towards peace and security is a core activity for the modern Australian Defence Force.

The Long Road analyses the successes and failures of ADF’s ‘train, advise, assist’ missions in Iraq, Afghanistan, Papua New Guinea, Bougainville, the Solomon Islands, South Vietnam and Uganda. With a diverse array of contributions from media commentators Chris Masters and Ian McPhedran, politicians Kevin Andrews and David Feeney, academics, aid workers and military personnel, The Long Road analyses Australia’s efforts to help its neighbours and partners avoid armed conflict.

On Ops: Lessons and Challenges for the Australian Army since East Timor

On Ops: Lessons and Challenges for the Australian Army since East Timor

No-one in the Australian government or Army could have predicted that in the 25 years following the end of the Cold War Army personnel would be deployed to Rwanda, Cambodia, Somalia, Bougainville, East Timor, Afghanistan, Iraq and the Solomon Islands. In a constructive critique of the modern Australian Army, ‘On Ops’ examines the massive transformation that has taken place since troops were deployed to East Timor 1999. After decades of inactivity and the ‘long peace’ of the 1970s and 1980s the Army was stretched to the limit. Contributors include John Howard and Peter Leahy as well as Craig Stockings, David Horner and an impressive array of military historians, academics, intelligence experts and ex and current Army.

Anzac Day Then & Now

Anzac Day Then & Now

Peter Stanley, Jeffrey Grey, Carolyn Holbrook, Ken Inglis, Tom Frame and others explore the rise of Australia’s unofficial national day.

Does Anzac Day honour those who died pursuing noble causes in war? Or is it part of a campaign to redeem the savagery associated with armed conflict? Do the rituals of 25 April console loved ones? Or reinforce security objectives and strategic priorities? Contributors explore the early debate between grieving families and veterans about whether Anzac Day should be commemorated or celebrated, the effect of the Vietnam War, popular culture’s reflection on the day and our political leaders’ increasing profile in public commemorations.

Moral Injury: Unseen Wounds in an Age of Barbarism

Moral Injury: Unseen Wounds in an Age of Barbarism

This collection of essays from ex-soldiers, military historians, chaplains and psychologists examines the unseen wounds sustained by Australians deployed to armed conflict, peacekeeping missions, humanitarian assistance and disaster relief.

While many psychical injuries heal, there is growing awareness that unseen wounds affecting the mind and the spirit are often the deepest and the most lasting. This book, the first Australian examination of moral injury, shows there are no easy answers and no simple solutions. It suggests where existing approaches are misguided, and how a multi-disciplinary approach is needed to gain a better sense of moral injury.