PhD Projects SEIT

Scholarships of $35,000 (AUD) are available for PhD students  who have achieved Honours 1/High Distinction in their UG program and/or have completed a Masters by Research.

Performance of axial flow hydrocyclones

Axial flow hydrocyclones have both exits in the same direction unlike the reverse flow hydrocyclones that are commonly used in industry. Early work has shown that axial flow hydrocyclones can reduce pressure drop and the challenge is to optimise the design of the vortex finder and the outlets to improve the separation efficiency so that the axial flow hydrocyclones can be used to separate a wide range of materials including coal, minerals, and waste effluent.

The aim of this project is to design an intelligent control system that can optimise the trajactory of an insect inspired flapping wing system. Owing to the high speed of the flapping, a high bandwidth control system is required which may be implemented on a Field Programmable Gate Array or neuromorphic hardware. Using machine learning and evolutionary techniques, the system will learn how to best control the angle of attack and flapping motion to most efficiently produce thrust.

Milimeter wave location-aware communication systems for the fifth generation of mobile communication

The fifth generation of mobile communication (5G) is being designed with a trend towards using millimetre frequency bands (mmWave) with a large number of antennas at the transmitter and receiver. Due to its low scattering and reflective nature, mmWave channels are spatially sparse with communication occurring via only a few propagation paths.

Dynamic collapse of metallic lattice structures

Metallic lattice materials have shown promise for lightweight sandwich panels that provide protection against blast and shock propagation. However, little is known of their dynamic spall characteristics (when shock-compressed) and their collapse under dynamic loading.

Intelligent Home Network Performance and Security Analysis

Broadband service providers receive many help‐desk calls because of networking issues in their customers' homes, and ever more of those are related to wireless technologies and security issues.

Ethically-Aligned Multiobjective Reinforcement Learning

Reinforcement Learning (RL) relies on a reward function as the only feedback in an interaction to learn complex tasks. Multi-objective RL (MORL) uses multiple reward functions. The aim of this thesis will be to produce new MORL algorithms that are capable to produce optimal and ethically aligned actions.

Multisource big spatial data analysis

The field of earth observation (EO), or remote sensing, is now facing significant challenges in the processing of image data for end user purposes because of the rapidly escalating numbers of missions and sensors, and because of the range of different types of sensor being orbited.

Numerical and experimental Investigation of the biomechanics of nerve damage

Nerve function can be impaired by localised compression of the nerve fibres due to injury or proximal tumour growth. This project will continue our work to develop and implement numerical and experimental techniques to predict the causes and extent of this damage. In particular it will use nonlinear, multi-scale, finite element models to investigate a range of nerve dysfunctions including bitemporal hemianopia and investigate experimental in-vitro techniques to validate these simulations.

Investigating Best Practices in Human-Systems Integration and Engineering Methodologies

This project aims at identifying current state of the art human systems integration techniques and creation of framework for an overarching or generalized human system integration framework that can be substantiated for different kinds of systems. Human systems integration practices are very domain specific for example healthcare, defence, aerospace etc.

Understanding the first year experience of engineering students

The aim of this project is to investigate the transition experience of students beginning an engineering degree. Of particular interest are the minority groups in engineering: women, mature age students, and at UNSW Canberra, civilian students in an otherwise military cohort.

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