PhD Projects SEIT

Scholarships of $35,000 (AUD) are available for PhD students  who have achieved Honours 1/High Distinction in their UG program and/or have completed a Masters by Research.

Real-time Distributed Lifelong Optimisation Algorithms for Swarm Intelligence

A swarm is a group of decentralized decision nodes that need to coordinate and synchronise actions to achieve an effect. One example is in computer Ad-hoc networks where the nodes need to swarm to maximise network throughput. This project aims at designing and proving optimality conditions for new optimisation algorithms.

Evolution of water-jets from the centrebow and demihull prior to wetdeck slamming event

Over the past three decades there has been increased military and commercial interest in lightweight high-speed ships, mainly due to their ability to provide fast sea transportation and relatively high payload capacity. Australia is an acknowledged world leader in the innovative design and construction of large high-speed aluminium catamarans, such as the vessels developed by Incat Tasmania and Austal.

Background

With the spread of IoT devices, security issues are becoming more severe, in part because of the large scale and heterogeneous nature of the devices.
There are an increasing number of insecure IoT devices with a high computational power, this makes them attractive targets for botnet creators.

Compromised IoT devices can be aggregated together through command and control servers to perform a diverse set of activities including; distributed denial of service, password cracking, and crypto-currency mining.

Quantum Acoustic Circuit Theory

Acoustics is the study of the propagation of low-frequency mechanical waves in matter. These waves may be quantized, and the study of these waves at the level of their quantum zero-point fluctuations has been termed quantum acoustics. Quantum acoustics has the potential to impact the design of quantum computers.

Understanding the aerodynamic interaction between Low Earth Orbit (LEO) objects and the space environment is essential for enabling precise orbit determination and prediction capabilities necessary for future space traffic management systems. Recent research at UNSW Canberra has shown that the charged aerodynamic interaction between Low Earth Orbit (LEO) objects and the ionosphere (i.e. ionospheric aerodynamics) is neither negligible nor well understood.

 

Accelerating hypersonic flight is characterised by rapidly changing flow conditions and high heat loads. To achieve sustained combustion in these engines, fuel injectors must be capable of also rapidly responding to changing flow conditions to ensure efficient and effective fuel delivery is maintained.

Predicting students’ final grades though their online engagement in collaborative learning  environment

Learning and teaching fully online is a challenging task as it requires maximum engagement with fellow students and the course convenor to create a sense of online community among distance learners.

Satellites provide data and services that are essential to modern society. Our civilian, commercial, and defence capability rely on continued and assured access to space-based infrastructure. The space environment, however, is harsh and represents a significant threat to the operation of such satellites. Collision with space debris, damage to spacecraft components through electrostatic discharge, and communication disruption from atmospheric anomalies are daily threats facing satellite systems and their operators.

Pages