PhD Projects SEIT

Scholarships of $35,000 (AUD) are available for PhD students  who have achieved Honours 1/High Distinction in their UG program and/or have completed a Masters by Research.

Implementation of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Algorithms using FPGAs

Direct Simulation Monte Carlo is a ubiquitous simulation method for low-density flows. It involves statistical simulation of representative populations of molecules in rarefied gas mixtures. The technique can simulate many physical processes very accurately at much less computational expense than direct molecular dynamic modelling.

Performance of axial flow hydrocyclones

Axial flow hydrocyclones have both exits in the same direction unlike the reverse flow hydrocyclones that are commonly used in industry. Early work has shown that axial flow hydrocyclones can reduce pressure drop and the challenge is to optimise the design of the vortex finder and the outlets to improve the separation efficiency so that the axial flow hydrocyclones can be used to separate a wide range of materials including coal, minerals, and waste effluent.

3D Fingerprint Identification

Conventional authentication mechanism relies on password or possession of token. However, password and token cannot genuinely identify a person as both password and token can be presented by someone else. Biometrics such as fingerprint, face, iris etc are quite uniquely representing individual. Therefore they are good tools for identity authentication. This project investigates latest biometrics authentication technology, i.e., 3D fingerprint identification.

Evolution of water-jets from the centrebow and demihull prior to wetdeck slamming event

Over the past three decades there has been increased military and commercial interest in lightweight high-speed ships, mainly due to their ability to provide fast sea transportation and relatively high payload capacity. Australia is an acknowledged world leader in the innovative design and construction of large high-speed aluminium catamarans, such as the vessels developed by Incat Tasmania and Austal.

Network Coding for Satellite Communications Systems

The aim of this project is to research network coding techniques for satellite communication systems. Specifically, this project will investigate techniques and methods to improve the performance and efficiency of satellite communication systems.

Flapping Wing Micro Aerial Robots – (I) Wing Compliance

Micro aerial robotics has been a nascent research interest due to its vast application potential. There have been a number of potential designs that have been tested including fixed wing, quadrotors, rotatory etc. as a suitable platforms. However these platforms are unsuitable at smaller scales due to a number of factors including aerodynamics inefficiency and limited maneuverability [1&2].

Secure control and estimation

The emergence of technologies relying on information networks have brought into prominence new challenges in the area of cyber-security concerned with security of industrial control and data acquisition systems. This project will involve research into the theory of cyber secure distributed control and estimation systems networks, focused on systems cooperation in the presence of strategic adversaries.

Numerical and experimental Investigation of the biomechanics of nerve damage

Nerve function can be impaired by localised compression of the nerve fibres due to injury or proximal tumour growth. This project will continue our work to develop and implement numerical and experimental techniques to predict the causes and extent of this damage. In particular it will use nonlinear, multi-scale, finite element models to investigate a range of nerve dysfunctions including bitemporal hemianopia and investigate experimental in-vitro techniques to validate these simulations.

Achieving appreciable thrust for both cruise and accelerating flight in scramjet engines is only half the solution for a viable engine. Equally important, is the design and validation of a vehicle structure capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads, and the resulting thermally induced structural stresses.

Mechanical Tests of Quantum Theory

Quantum mechanics was developed as a theory of atomic behaviour. It was soon applied to light, assemblies of atoms, and subatomic particles. More recently, electrical circuits and mechanical systems operating in the quantum regime have been realized. This raises the question as to what, if any, are the ultimate limits to the application of quantum mechanics to physical systems.

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